Pixel Corps TV

Episode Guide

117

December 3rd, 2008

Analysis Paralysis

Where are the early adopters going now? What do you do when you have too much content? and is Facebook Connect the next beacon?
 
116

November 26th, 2008

Dear Journalist...

If it's news it will find you, good bloggers are thinkers and linkers, and news is a living article.
 
115

November 18th, 2008

Cut The Cord

Motrin gets a headache. Will our President Elect Twitter? And the online video cat is out of the bag.
 
114

November 5th, 2008

Ready, Set, Go

How to start your own podcast when the industry is taking a hit.
 
113

October 29th, 2008

Political Edition

A special political segment, gotchya elections, how the audience votes with its mouse, and Tina Fey at 62 million views and counting.
 
112

October 21st, 2008

Who-ville

Who's following who? Who's going under? And who in Hollywood knows anything?
 
111

October 14th, 2008

52 Inches of Evolving Fun

Pulling the plug on Cable, will NetFlix take it's place? And traditional journalists vs Joe Sixpack.
 
Running time: 55:33
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November 26th, 2008

Dear Journalist...

Daisy Whitney,
Alex Lindsay

If it's news it will find you, good bloggers are thinkers and linkers, and news is a living article.

4 Comments

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Submitted by Lucy on Wed, 05/27/2009 - 01:10

After facts are established,

Submitted by hankjmatt on Sat, 03/21/2009 - 06:48

After facts are established, then statements of policy and intent are made. The Economist.com podcasts frequently use phrases like "the Economist argues" or "the Economist thinks that" as obvious markers of where reporting ends and analysis starts. flash game

If it's news it will find

Submitted by Learlear on Mon, 03/09/2009 - 21:49

If it's news it will find you, good bloggers are thinkers and linkers, and news is a living article.
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Media Journalism and Importance of Stance

Submitted by ActuaryOfTriumph on Wed, 11/26/2008 - 20:00

I'm curious to what extent journalists interviewed consider themselves reporters versus tastemakers.

I enjoy the Economist magazine very much as it has very solid reporting and a no non-sense approach to topics like sanitation, prostitution, and the positive effects of globalization that never receive level-headed treatment elsewhere. After facts are established, then statements of policy and intent are made. The Economist.com podcasts frequently use phrases like "the Economist argues" or "the Economist thinks that" as obvious markers of where reporting ends and analysis starts. To what extend is media coverage "first person" (I believe) versus "third person" (it is the case that).

Compare this to something like book or movie reviews where objective reporting would be trickier and I imagine rather dull. Reviewers shape the topics they consider by influencing opinion which may not be the case with "classic" journalism at least in the US. I'm drawn to media coverage with a known stance more so than with news, I'm left of center on many topics but consider the bent of MSNBC to be inappropriate if they consider themselves a news station unless the editorial page is clearly marked.

Not to be little media journalism, but the stakes seem to be lower if one fails to be factual. I know Daisy has mentioned cases where she was hounded by firms for having missed a fact, but this seems to pale compared to the backlashes that affect larger firms. Is this due to size or topic?